All posts by Roger Smith

Artificial Intelligence and Access to Justice in the US and England and Wales.

There is a lot of activity happening under the umbrella of artificial intelligence. In this country and in the field of access to justice, much of it is, however prospective – promised rather than realised. In the US, matters are further ahead and there are interesting developments like the Learned Hands gamification of problem classification … Continue reading Artificial Intelligence and Access to Justice in the US and England and Wales.

Legal aid, technology and the roads to revival

Earlier this week, the Government of British Columbia announced the publication of a report entitled Roads to Revival on legal aid. It was undertaken by Jamie Maclaren QC, a practising lawyer involved in pro bono and student legal advice programs. This makes BC the latest jurisdiction in a long line to provide an analysis of … Continue reading Legal aid, technology and the roads to revival

Automated Decision-Making, Predictive Algorithms and a Coda.

Sod’s Law. You write a piece about automated decision-making and its potential relevance to the advice sector. You use what appear to be the best current examples – from Sweden, Australia and an EU study. From the UK, you report only a denial of any use of predictive algorithms from the Department of Work and … Continue reading Automated Decision-Making, Predictive Algorithms and a Coda.

Automated Decision-Making and its lessons for the advice sector

The role of automated decision-making in the justice system has attracted some attention – much of it centred around algorithms that advise judges on decisions about bail. But automated decision-making is expanding throughout the public realm and issues for advisers are beginning to tumble out. What happens, for example, when an algorithm is wrong, discriminatory … Continue reading Automated Decision-Making and its lessons for the advice sector

Court Modernisation: research, consultancy and measurement

We know how the court modernisation programme  for England and Wales will end. Some equivalent of George W Bush will proclaim on a stand in for the USS Abraham Lincoln that the mission has been  triumphantly accomplished. The reality in the courts, as in world politics, is likely to be more complex. One reason that … Continue reading Court Modernisation: research, consultancy and measurement