Category Archives: ODR

Online Dispute Resolution

Digitalising Courts is More than a Management Issue.

A speech earlier this month from the Senior President of Tribunals for England and Wales looked dull enough. Entitled ‘Securing Open Justice’, it set before the Max Planck Institute in Luxembourg – safely out of the jurisdiction – a contemporary assessment of what Sir Ernest Ryder saw as the current issues. But, what it reveals … Continue reading Digitalising Courts is More than a Management Issue.

Rightsnet: a model for virtual specialist support

This is the first of two posts looking at the work of London-based social welfare law organisation, Lasa. This considers its best known product, rightsnet. Rightsnet  provides news, case law and discussion fora of particular use to welfare rights workers but open to all, supplemented by further subscription only material. And it does all this … Continue reading Rightsnet: a model for virtual specialist support

‘Let’s Sleep with Google’: an interview with John Mayer

John Mayer is a veteran of the US legal services technology movement. He has been executive director of CALI (the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction)  since 1994. He added an engagement in legal services to the Center’s main concern with legal education.  CALI is best know for its interactive tutorials for law students, but is … Continue reading ‘Let’s Sleep with Google’: an interview with John Mayer

The Online Solutions Court: decision trees in the desert

You would not expect Dubai’s bid to become a global judicial decision hub in commercial disputes to have much relevance for the Online Solutions Court for small claims proposed for England and Wales. However, the Dubai International Financial Centre and the Dubai Future Foundation have combined to create a Courts for the Future Forum to … Continue reading The Online Solutions Court: decision trees in the desert

The Online Solutions Court: Follow the Money

There were two surprises at the Sixth National Forum on Access to Justice for those without Means held in London and organised through the aegis of a committee of the Civil Justice Council concerned with litigants in person. The first was positive: the speakers included some who were not British. The second less so: there … Continue reading The Online Solutions Court: Follow the Money