Australian report emphasises what works approach to self help

An Australian study emphasises the need for research on ‘what works, for whom and for what’ in relation to self help materials, digital or otherwise. The report was published by the Law and Justice Foundation of New South Wales in its December Justice Issues and written by Hugh M. McDonald, Suzie Forell and Zhigang Wei. The study has … Continue reading Australian report emphasises what works approach to self help

Access to Justice Tech: Towards a Taxonomy

Gabriel Teninbaum is a professor. He is director of Suffolk University Law School’s Institute on Legal Innovation and Technology. I have never met him. But, he posted an interesting tweet on 12 December: ‘Can anyone point me to an existing taxonomy of legal tech?  I’m not as interested in specific products as categories of tools, … Continue reading Access to Justice Tech: Towards a Taxonomy

Access to justice and technology: Ontario to explore what works

The Law Foundation of Ontario has invested over $CAN400,000 (£230,000, $US302,000 or 273,000 euros) in six research projects designed to report on how technology is being used to provide access to access to justice. Its approach contrasts with that manifest, for example, in the NESTA Legal Access Challenge or the Legal Services Corporation’s Technical Initiatives … Continue reading Access to justice and technology: Ontario to explore what works

Legaltech and the Law Society: a comparative analysis

The Law Society of England and Wales is getting its act together over Legal Tech. It has just published a comparative analysis of the adoption of legal tech in the UK and in other jurisdictions. Access to justice plays a minor part in this study but the state of law tech provides its surrounding context. … Continue reading Legaltech and the Law Society: a comparative analysis

Online Courts and the Future of Justice: the latest from Richard Susskind

Richard Susskind has written a new book. It is entitled Online Courts and the Future of Justice, published by OUP. If you are interested in the judicial system, you have to read it. This will not be difficult. Professor Susskind’s prose comes at you with the force of an express train or breakers smashing on … Continue reading Online Courts and the Future of Justice: the latest from Richard Susskind