January 2021: what did I miss?

1 January  Adobe Flash Player ‘laid to rest’, reports BBC. 3 January ‘As Uber parks its plans for robotaxis, experts admit the autonomous vehicle challenge is bigger than anticipated,’ reports Guardian. 4 January ‘Slack messaging service suffers global outage,’ says Guardian. 5 January Children’s Commissioner calls for broadband companies ‘to step up’ in terms of … Continue reading January 2021: what did I miss?

Outreach by Zoom: the experience of the People’s Law School of BC

A number of access to justice organisations are experimenting with the use of video programmes, like Zoom, to replace traditional outreach work impeded by the pandemic. This was, for example, a topic raised by a speaker from Sheffield Law Centre in the December Law Centre Network conference. But the world leader in this field must … Continue reading Outreach by Zoom: the experience of the People’s Law School of BC

Signposts from New Zealand

New Zealand and the United Kingdom have historically had close ties of economy and politics. These were closer, of course, before the UK turned its face to Europe and shafted the Kiwi agricultural economy in the 1970s. But, now we may grow back together again as small island nations outside the major trading blocs. Whatever … Continue reading Signposts from New Zealand

Court Modernisation: what was the point again?

The star of a recent conference on the court modernisation programme from the Westminster Legal Policy Forum was Yvonne Gallagher, the National Audit Office’s (NAO) digital transformation officer.  She was announced as going to say ‘from her point of view, it’s all about money’. The NAO has, indeed, hammered the programme and its sponsoring department … Continue reading Court Modernisation: what was the point again?

The US, technology and access to civil justice: the top ten lessons for a passing Brit

What are the top ten themes in the ongoing development of technology in access to justice to be gleaned from last week’s Legal Services Corporation conference? This is my selection. They are unavoidably coloured by the prejudices and experience of a Brit. The full nuance of the local may well not have been appreciated.  Anyway, … Continue reading The US, technology and access to civil justice: the top ten lessons for a passing Brit