Tag Archives: Law Society of England and Wales

That was the Month that Was: April 2020

1 April  People’s Law School in British Columbia gets praise on Twitter for exemplary lay out of answers to common legal questions raised by Covid 19. It demonstrates nice use of Q and A; drop down information; and individual stories. The best presentation of this type anywhere in the world? Gemma Bryne of Citizens Advice … Continue reading That was the Month that Was: April 2020

Legaltech and the Law Society: a comparative analysis

The Law Society of England and Wales is getting its act together over Legal Tech. It has just published a comparative analysis of the adoption of legal tech in the UK and in other jurisdictions. Access to justice plays a minor part in this study but the state of law tech provides its surrounding context. … Continue reading Legaltech and the Law Society: a comparative analysis

The Law Society: Lawyers, Technology and St Paul

OK. I fess up. Last month, I ghosted a memo which commended the report of the Law Society of England and Wales on Technology, Access to Justice and the Rule of Law. However, I said that ‘the next report should aim for a more clearly defined audience. The key question seems to be this. What … Continue reading The Law Society: Lawyers, Technology and St Paul

Artificial Intelligence and Access to Justice: Hitting the Wall

Two days ago, I attended The Artificial Intelligence in Legal Services summit to promote a Law Society report on algorithm use in the criminal justice system. The publication merits its own, later, post. The day, not without its problems, however, raised issues about Artificial Intelligence and Access to Justice. Indulge me for a minute before we … Continue reading Artificial Intelligence and Access to Justice: Hitting the Wall

Technology and Access to Justice: trends in the private sector

One of the emerging themes in the use of technology in the access to justice field is the realisation by not for profit agencies that they should adopt the basic customer management tools developed in the private sector. They share a common need – though perhaps not always a common language – to reduce cost … Continue reading Technology and Access to Justice: trends in the private sector